DevReady PodcastSucceding with Software Business with Stewart Marshall – Episode 59

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On this episode of the DevReady Podcast, Andrew Romeo and Anthony Sap talk to Stewart Marshall, commercial software strategist and SaaS extraordinaire.

Stewart covers everything from using software to solve problems and implementation. He says that most people just want their problems solved, but devs need to think about it in the context of the system as a whole. As a SaaS expert, Stewart also joins the podcast to talk about some of the hurdles that software services overcome in the developmental stages as well as in going to market.

“We would’ve had a lot more dead people…we would’ve had to shut down more businesses [if COVID had happened pre-internet] because there was no internet to go to.” – Stewart Marshall

This is Stewart’s guide to developing a business plan for any startup itching to deliver a tech solution:

  1. Articulate the problem.
  2. Understand whose problem it is.

Get it to a point where you can walk up to a person and say “here’s the problem we have and here’s how we’re going to solve it.” Then you have a business. But remember that technology on its own is not a solution but merely a tool.

A key takeaway from this episode is Stewart’s advice to founders about incorporating technology. He says it’s like looking at a jigsaw puzzle. The commercial side of the business will look at the picture, but the technical side will look at the pieces and how they fit together. When they work together, you get a really good outcome.

“Customer needs are a much easier target to hit because they’re slower-moving.” – Anthony Sapountzis

Topics Covered:
● How COVID has forced digitization on Australia?
● SaaS experts today and what they have to offer.
● Smart marketing to your target audience.
● Software is only a tool.
● Mistrust in the technology sphere because of pricing structure.
● The AI arms race of the future.
● The distinction between customer needs and the customer wants.
● Why UX & UI are inherently complicated?
● Need to be inquisitive?